The Boston Diaries

The ongoing saga of a programmer who doesn't live in Boston, nor does he even like Boston, but yet named his weblog/journal “The Boston Diaries.”

Go figure.

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

“It's not my fault!”

Hey guys. It's me. The guy who put the exhaust ports on the Death Star.

I know, I know—

“What a stupid design flaw!”

“You are singlehandedly responsible for the destruction of our ultimate weapon and battlestation!”

“How could anyone have made such a huge mistake?!”

Over the past week, I've gotten a lot of guff from people I considered to be friends and colleagues about how my “shoddy” design would be the downfall of our entire government. Not only that, but I've been forced-choked (and regular-choked) by more superiors than I can count (and Human Resources have been very relunctant to respond to my complaints about being invisibly strangled by a cyborg space wizard). But I have one response to all of you who blame for the destruction of the Death Star:

Via Flutterby, An Open Letter From a Death Star Architect - Dorkly Article

And yes, you'll have to read it to find out what the Death Star architect's response was. And yes, the architect has a point—it's not like anyone could have forseen such events.

I mean, what are the chances?

Obligatory Picture

[Don't hate me for my sock monkey headphones.]

Obligatory Links

Obligatory Miscellaneous

You have my permission to link freely to any entry here. Go ahead, I won't bite. I promise.

The dates are the permanent links to that day's entries (or entry, if there is only one entry). The titles are the permanent links to that entry only. The format for the links are simple: Start with the base link for this site: http://boston.conman.org/, then add the date you are interested in, say 2000/08/01, so that would make the final URL:

http://boston.conman.org/2000/08/01

You can also specify the entire month by leaving off the day portion. You can even select an arbitrary portion of time.

You may also note subtle shading of the links and that's intentional: the “closer” the link is (relative to the page) the “brighter” it appears. It's an experiment in using color shading to denote the distance a link is from here. If you don't notice it, don't worry; it's not all that important.

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