The Boston Diaries

The ongoing saga of a programmer who doesn't live in Boston, nor does he even like Boston, but yet named his weblog/journal “The Boston Diaries.”

Go figure.

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

More on that “tool vs. crutch” debate

An empirical test of ideas proposed by Martin Heidegger shows the great German philosopher to be correct: Everyday tools really do become part of ourselves.

The findings come from a deceptively simple study of people using a computer mouse rigged to malfunction. The resulting disruption in attention wasn’t superficial. It seemingly extended to the very roots of cognition.

“The person and the various parts of their brain and the mouse and the monitor are so tightly intertwined that they're just one thing,” said Anthony Chemero, a cognitive scientist at Franklin & Marshall College. “The tool isn't separate from you. It's part of you.”

Your Computer Really Is a Part of You | Wired Science | Wired.com

More food for thought in the tool vs. crutch debate

Obligatory Picture

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Obligatory Links

Obligatory Miscellaneous

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